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Help2021-04-14T23:40:02+01:00

Not sure about artwork, print terminology online ordering? Read our FAQ’s below.

If you don’t find the answer you are looking for below e-mail us at

[email protected] 

Who Are We?2021-02-17T13:02:07+00:00

Who is More Than Just Print?

More than just print launched in 2020 as an online print shop, but we’re part of The Printroom Group. We are a family run business since 1977, we have four print sites across the Thames Valley and employ over 30 staff in Bracknell, Reading and Camberley. Our clients include some of the largest companies in the world. These include Dell, Oracle Corporation and HP. Find out more about The Printroom Group.

More than just print is part of The Printroom Group – the Thames Valley’s leading family-run print business for over 40 years.

Our Registered office address is:

Bassett House, 5 Southwell Park Road, Camberley, Surrey, GU15 3PU

 

Our Company Registration number is : 02625538

Returns Policy2021-05-14T03:42:25+01:00

Returns Policy

More Than Just Print offer a Return Policy. If you are unhappy with your order, please return it to us within 14 days and we will either reprint or refund you.

Our Returns Address is:

More Than Just Print

Printroom House

Downmill Road,

Bracknell Berkshire RG12 1QS

 

Please e-mail us first at [email protected] so that our team can investiagte.

 

My Order Hasn’t arrived – Track Your Order2020-10-26T00:24:55+00:00

My Order Hasn’t arrived, what can I do!

The first thing that you should do if your order has not arrived should be to contact the Courier that we have used, you can track your order using the links below.

DHL Express – Track Your Order

If your item has been shipped with DHL express you can locate your order here.

Royal Mail – Track Your Order

If your order has been sent out using Royal mail please call our client services team on 01344 452778 or speak to us using the live chat (between 9-5 pm). Alternatively, you can e-mail us at [email protected]

Please remember to have your order number to hand so that we can locate your order on our system.

UCS – Tracking

If your item has been sent out using UCS then you can locate your order here

If you still would like to contact us our contact details are here.

I have uploaded the wrong Artwork to my order HELP!2020-10-26T00:25:27+00:00

If you have uploaded the wrong artwork e-mail us at [email protected] with your order number as soon as possible.

If your order isn’t printed we will stop it and you will be able to e-mail new artwork into us straight away.

We also have a live chat on our site from 9-5 pm Monday to Friday and you can also reach us there.

If you still would like to contact us our contact details are here.

How Does VAT Work?2020-10-26T00:25:56+00:00

VAT is Value Added Tax. The current rate for VAT in the UK is 20%.

VAT is added to most products sold however, there are some exemptions. VAT is not added to books, manuals, and advertising leaflets.

VAT registered companies are able to claim VAT back. For more detailed explanations on VAT please look at these resources.

VAT Explained for SME’s.

Sage Accounting VAT explanation.

If you still would like to contact us our contact details are here.

Printing Terminlogy2020-10-25T23:43:28+00:00

Here we have listed some basic printing terminology to help you understand our services a little better.
If there is anything that you don’t understand or are still unsure, then get in contact with us using the online chat or calling 0845 072 2778 and we will update our page accordingly.

Artwork, Pre-Press, and Files

Bleed
If your document contains background colours or imagery that goes to the edge of the page, bleed should be added so the content goes beyond the edge. This excess will then be trimmed off, ensuring your artwork is printed to the edge of the page. If edge to edge printing (full bleed) is required, we recommend a 3mm bleed on your artwork. If a bleed is not added then white borders may be visible.

Crop marks/cut marks/trim marks
Crop marks, also known as cut marks and trim marks, are small lines placed in the corner of your artwork to indicate the artwork trim size. Crop marks and bleed will guide the print finisher when trimming the document.

DPI
DPI means ‘dots per inch’ – the number of little printed dots there is in an inch of your printed document. The larger the DPI, the larger the number of dots and therefore the clearer the print. Typically, printed artwork requires an output resolution of 300dpi. Digital display artwork requires an output resolution of 72dpi. If you send us artwork that is not 300dpi then there is a risk of this being pixelated when printing.

Papers and Stocks and Other Printing Terminology

FSC® certified paper
FSC® (Forest Stewardship Council®) – an international, non-governmental organization who promotes the practice of responsible forestry. This paper is typically used on business cards, printed documents, and book and manual covers.

Paper stock
This refers to the type of paper that we print on. The standard options are gloss, matt and silk paper.

Gloss paper
Gloss is ideal for colour printing and is commonly used for magazines, brochures and flyers. It is a smooth, shiny and reflective paper finish. Due to the reflective nature of the paper, it can show fingerprints more easily than matt paper. Gloss paper is also difficult to write on and is not recommended for diaries, workbooks, forms etc. Suitable for: magazines, brochures, flyers, photobooks, book and manual covers.

Matt paper
Matt paper stock is similar to your standard home or office paper. It is used for a wide range of documents, from forms and letters to essays, corporate stationery and more. It is easy to write on and does not reflect light. Suitable for: letters, forms, essays, corporate stationery and manual inner pages.

Silk paper
Silk is a great all-rounder, with a finish halfway between matt and gloss. It is a popular choice for documents which include a mix of text and images. Suitable for: softback books, booklets, brochures, leaflets, posters, manuals, documents, and more.

Paper weight (gsm)
Paper weight is referred to in gsm (grams per square metre). It refers to the weight of the paper. Typically, the higher the gsm, the thicker the paper.

  • 100gsm is our standard white paper stock for colour printing. It is often used for letters compliment slips, forms and surveys.
  • 120gsm is a better quality option offering less transparency. It is good for professional documents such as reports, presentations, and CVs.
  • 150gsm is slightly thicker than the standard home or office printing paper. it is used for presentations, reports and brochures.
  • 160gsm bridges the gap between paper and card. It is a thicker paper option offering extra durability. It is good for brochures and high-quality flyers.
  • 170gsm silk is usually used for large posters and 170gsm gloss is a popular choice for leaflets, calendars and more.
  • 200gsm is a heavier stock, making it ideal for document covers or thick sheets.
  • 250gsm is ideal for document covers and commonly used for greetings cards, invitations and booklet or brochure covers.
  • 300gsm/350gsm is one of our thickest available paper stocks for some products. It is perfect for business cards, loyalty cards, bookmarks, postcards and other print jobs that require a thick or luxury finish.

Colour

Pantone® colour
Pantone is a colour matching system that is universally used by many industries, including print, graphic design, paint-making and fashion. The Pantone Matching System (PMS) allows us to make sure we are printing your colours perfectly if you have a Pantone reference in your artwork. To read more about Pantone colours then have a road of our blog on our main website, here.

RGB
RGB refers to the colour model that is used to display graphics on-screen. It stands for Red, Green and Blue because these are the three main colours used to create all the colours you see on your screen.

CMYK
CMYK refers to the colour model that is used for full-colour printing. It stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (Black). This is representative of the four colours used in printers.

Finishing and Binding

Print finishing
Finishing refers to all the activities that are performed on printed material after it has been printed. It includes binding, putting individual sheets together, folding, stapling, foiling, embossing, laminating, encapsulating… The possibilities are endless with print finishing and it determines how the end product will look.

Perfect binding
Pages are fixed to a cover or spine using glue. This process is mainly used for softback books.

Saddle stitching
Pages are bound by driving staples through the centre of the spine of folded sheets. This technique is commonly used for magazines, newsletters and small catalogues, but is limited in the number of pages that can be bound.

Side stitching
This type of binding is less common than saddle stitching. The staples are driven through the pages, usually parallel to the binding margin. Reports are often bound this way.

Spiral binding/Wire binding
A continuous wire or plastic coil is threaded through holes drilled or punched into a stack of sheets. This is the most popular method of binding manuals and documents that are used frequently.

Loose-leaf binding
A set of holes is drilled in a stack of sheets which are then inserted into standard or customised ring binders. This binding technique is used for presentations, financial reports, manuals, or any other type of publication that require frequent updating.

For tips on binding methods, please refer to our blog: What type of binding should I use?

Personalised print
This means that the print is personalised. Each printed piece may have a different company name or address on for large mailouts or may be personalised to each person on a training course.

Embossing and debossing
Embossing is the process of adding a raised image to a book cover or other printed material. Sometimes an ink or foil is used to accent the raised image. Debossing is the opposite, creating a sunken image on the material.

Foiling
Foil can be a real eyecatcher when applied to book or magazine covers. This is especially true for metallic foils which reflect light and add a silvery or golden glow. Such foils are applied using a pattern on a heated die that presses a roll of foil against the material.

Laminating
The usual term for laminating would be to encase the printed sheet in a plastic cover, however, laminating in printing terms is slightly different. Laminating refers to a coat or cover that can be applied to printed matter, which means no plastic outer; it looks just like a normal print but adds a professional feel to your documents. We offer a gloss, matt, or soft-touch lamination.

Encapsulation
Encapsulation is what we printers refer to as bonding the printed sheet between two layers of plastic material – not to be confused with lamination. A typical example of this would be menu cards for restaurants which often need to be both sturdy and waterproof.

Die-cutting
Irregularly shaped printed matter such as coasters or labels are cut out of the material in a process called die-cutting. The die contains knives or creasing rules that have been prepared specifically for a certain shape.

Spot UV
Similar to our foiling method, spot UV is a high gloss coating that is applied using a pattern on a heated die that presses the UV gloss against the material. It gives an extra gloss shine to certain areas of the printing that you want to highlight.

You can request a sample pack to see what these finishes look first-hand, and to help you make a decision on your specialist finishing options.

Large Format Artwork Guide2020-10-06T00:33:21+01:00

Large Format Artwork Guide

To produce the perfect printed graphic or board read our Large Format Artwork Guide. The guide below details what we like, and don’t like when supplying artwork.

We love a PDF file. However, if you don’t have a PDF file, send us an EPS, AI, PSD or TIFF file and we will send you back a PDF proof. If you want to convert your file to PDF yourself, click on our help page. We can print from either High-Resolution PDF files or JPEG files. And if you want some more info on artwork files, click on our artwork guide here.

 

All artwork must be supplied

  • With 5mm Bleed (when scaled to full size) or 10mm for double graphics.
  • With Crop Marks
  • Each Design as a separate file or page
  • At the Correct width to height ratio
  • In CMYK colour
  • With all images embedded
  • With all fonts converted to outlines/curves/shapes
  • With all visible in-canvas template elements removed

 

Accepted File Formats:

  • PDF
  • EPS (Encapsulated PostScript)
  • AI (Adobe Illustrator)
  • INDD (Adobe InDesign) PSD (Adobe Photoshop, recommend flattened)
  • JPG/JPEG (Recommended high-resolution)

 

What we can’t accept for our Large Format printed products:

  • Without bleed
  • Without crop marks
  • With multiple artworks on one page
  • At an incorrect width to height ratio
  • In RGB colour mode
  • With missing links and images which are not embedded
  • Without Fonts converted to outlines/Curves/Shapes
  • Protected by a password

Unacceptable File Formats:

  • QXP (Quark Xpress)
  • CDR (Coral Draw)
  • SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics)
  • GIF
  • PNG
  • BMP
  • DOC/DOCX 9Microsoft Word)
  • XLS/XLSX (Microsoft Excel
  • PPT/PPTX (Microsoft PowerPoint)
  • PUB (Microsoft Publisher)

 

Artwork Check List

  • Have you supplied high-resolution artwork?
  • Is the artwork CMYK?
  • Do you have 3/5mm bleed on all edges of artwork?
  • Are fonts outlined?
  • Are all graphics 300dpi?
  • Has artwork been spell-checked?

 

 

Please Note:

We cannot be held responsible for issues contained in the supplied artwork. These things include spelling mistakes, grammatical errors, RGB colour mode, overprint, resolution, missing fonts and missing images. To avoid these issues please read artwork spec sheet above.

 

Artwork not supplied correctly will likely render the end result unsatisfactory or delay your order. If you are unsure about the artwork you have please check with us before-hand to ensure there are no complications with your order.

 

If artwork cannot be used to produce what has been ordered, we will advise you of this and request how you would like to proceed.

If the artwork size is different from the ordered size, the ordered size will take precedence. This is due to the fact that artworks from our clients are supplied in a variety of scales.

With subjective issues of quality such as image resolution, we will advise you if the quality is extremely low.

 

To see our full range of products click here.

If you would like to jump straight to some of our large format products click on the links below:

Pop-Up Stands, Deluxe Roller Banners, Double Sided Roller Banners, Premium Roller Banners, Magnetic Dry Wipe Boards, Pavement Signs, Lamppost & Bollard Covers, Lamp Post DisplaysLife Size Cardboard Cut-Outs, Wall Planners, Banner Frames, Fabric Pop-Up Banners, Oslo Media Stand, Fabric Pop Up Stand, San Francisco Pop Up Stand, New York Pop-Up Stand, Fabric Lightbox Stand, Slim Fabric Pop-Up Stand, Printed Tablecloths, Pop-Up Towers, Counta display, Hop-Up Stand, Fin Flags, Economy Flags, Teardrop Flags, Wind Dancer Flags, Feather Flags, Crest Flags.

What is Cracking?2020-09-21T17:29:07+01:00

Cracking is when thick paper hasn’t been scored first. The surface of the paper literally cracks and exposes the fibres inside the paper causing a fluffy pulp to be exposed.

The ink or toner of the print cracks off and shows the white of the paper underneath.

You will notice on cheap printing where scoring hasn’t been done before folding that this has happened.

What is gsm?2021-05-13T02:37:39+01:00

What is GSM?

What is GSM is asked by a lot of our clients when buying a print.

GSM stands for Grams per Square Meter. In the UK, Paper is measured in grams per square metre (GSM). The higher the GSM, the heavier the paper. However, this does not always mean that the paper is thicker (we will get into that a little bit more later in this post).

 Thicker the paper. There are varying weights of GSM paper, meaning you can find the right one for a number of different applications.

Paper comes in thousands of varieties and textures. All papers have a GSM related to them. The GSM rating is a good way for both printers and consumers to know if the paper is thin, like a newspaper or sturdy like a business card.

What does GSM mean to me?

GSM will let you know exactly what paper to use in your project. When you are using an online printing company, like www.morethanjustprint.co.uk, you cant feel the paper. So you won’t if you are buying a thin piece or thicker, heavier paper. So to make the best decision of paper stocks for your printing project, look at the GSM that is stated on each project, and it will give you an idea of what you are buying.

Most print companies, well, I’d say ALL online print companies, will want you to be happy with your product. Therefore we will let our customers choose what we think is going to be best for your project. For example, the best weights for printing business cards is from 300gsm up to 810gsm. So our standard business cards are 350gsm in weight, and our premium cards are 810gsm. We won’t sell business cards printed onto 170gsm, 200gsm or 250gsm as it’s too light. You just won’t be happy. And it wouldn’t be a business card, just a cut piece of paper.

What are the Common Paperweights..and what are they used for?

Common Gsm Paper Weights:

80gsm – black and white photocopyingtraining manualshomework booksprocess books, instruction guides

100gsm – Standard letterhead paper, notepads, training manuals, wire-bound books.

120gsm – Higher quality letterheadsCompliments slips and Business stationery.

130gsm – Lightweight Flyersleaflets and takeaway menus and price lists.

150gsm – flyersbrochure pagesleaflets

170gsm – leaflets, data sheets

200gsm – datasheetssoftback book covers

250gsm – book covers,  product spec sheetsdatasheets, flat menus, menus

350gsm –  invitestable talkers, Wedding Stationery, Book covers

400gsm – Business Cards

At More Than Just Print, the paperweights we use on our small format printing machines are 80gsm paper, 100gsm paper, 120gsm paper, 130gsm paper, 170gsm and 350gsm and 400gsm. We also use a 810gsm for our Deluxe Business cards 

Choosing The Perfect Paper Stock

When choosing your printed item, consider the paperweight and the type of paper that will be best for the product. You will want the look and feel of the paper to give you the best result for your finished item. The right paper will help create an impressive first impression. This will help your customer either visit your event, buy your product and generally get you the result you want to achieve. 

The quality of the paper stock you choose is a reflection of your brand or event. 

GSM is not Thickness!

One thing to take notice of is that GSM is the weight of the paper and not the thickness of the article. A Gloss paper is thinner than uncoated paper. 

For example, you could have two sheets of paper, both 170gsm, but if one is Silk and one is gloss, the gloss paper will feel thinner.

Gloss paper has a lighter density than Silk and un-coated paper. Silk paper is not as dense as uncoated paper either. 

 You will also find that different paper manufacturers like GF Smith, Mohawk, and Conqueror will all have different densities.

Think of a tonne of feathers. It’s the same weight as a tonne of bricks, but it is not as dense. I know which I’d rather have fall on me!

Microns

Paper that is 170gsm and over is aboard. 

Microns are used to measure the thickness of boards too.

 One micron = 1/1000 of a millimetre.

To Find out more about GSM read our article here.

What is Bleed?2020-09-21T17:29:57+01:00

When using a print company to print your files they will not print to the edge of the paper.

Your printing company will print your image onto a larger sheet of paper and trim the paper to the edge.

This will let your image run straight off the edge of the sheet, thus there will be no white border.

To find out how to set your file up with bleed read our article here.

What Is A Mail-Merge2020-09-21T17:30:18+01:00

Mail Merge lets you create a batch of different documents that are personalised. This is also popular when printing letterheads with individual letters printed on each.

This is most popular if you are sending out a letter to a lot of different people and you would “Mail-Merge” the document with an Excel Spreadsheet or other data source so that every letter would have a different address on.

Using this application you can go much deeper than just adding an address.

Using this method you can change the name and many different details throughout the letter.

Mail merge is found within most modern data processing software on the market today.

 

What is A4 Size Paper ?2020-09-25T03:14:59+01:00

What Size is A4 paper?

Many people ask “What are A4 dimensions? or “What is A4 size paper?”  It is the most popular paper size in the UK, in both business and homes. The size of A4 paper measures 210mm x 297mm is half the size of A3. A4 is standard letter size in the U.K.  A4 paper is commonly used for letters, letterheads and general photocopying. Paper printing onto A4 sheets is still classed as small format printing and can be run on most small format digital printing machines. A4 paper can also be used in the making of A5 booklets, where 1 A4 page is printed and folded into 4  A5 pages.

 

What size is A4 Size Paper?

 

A4 Dimensions

Paper Size A4

A4 Dimensions in millimetres 210mm x 297mm

A4 Dimensions in Centimetres: 29.7 x 42cms

A4 Dimensions in Inches: 11.7 x 16.5 in

An A4 piece of paper is exactly half of an A3 piece of paper and double an A5 piece of paper.

You can calculate the weight of an A4 sheet of paper by knowing that it is 1/16th of an A0 sheet. For an A0 sheet weighing 80gsm/m2, an A3 sheet will weigh 8o/8 = 5 grams.

 

What is A4 Printing Used For?

The surface of an A4 sheet is perfectly suitable for creating any design ideas when you need something bigger than A5 size. A4 paper is used for photos and printing children’s pictures at home.

A4  is also good for presentation printing. A4 paper can be bound landscape to make a larger book than normal and is ideal for printing charts and Excel Spreadsheets for a meeting. Tables and Diagrams are better presented when printed onto an A4 size sheet of paper.

It is also very popular for making small posters, used in may shop windows or offices for displaying messages. Fire Exit posters, warning posters and other Health and Safety posters are popular in A4 .

Nearly all letters and memos are printed in A4 size.

DL envelopes are designed to hold an A4 sheet of paper folded into three.

Letterheads are printed in A4 size.

 

History of  Paper Sizes

The A paper sizes go back to the German scientist and philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.

At the beginning of the 20th Century, a Dr Walter Porstmann turned this idea into a system of paper sizes. This was introduced as the DIN paper sizes on the 18th August 1922 in Germany. Even in 2020 paper sizes are still referred to as “DIN A4” in Germany and Austria.

A3 size paper was first standardised in the UK in 1975.

What Styles of Binding are Available?2020-10-25T23:45:05+00:00

What Styles of Binding are Available?

At More Than Just Print We offer various Binding Types. These include.

Wire-binding (also Spiral binding)

Fold And Stitched Books

Perfect Binding.

Hard Back Binding

Wire binding

Wire binding is a popular binding method and is also commonly known as wiro binding, spiral binding and coil binding. Wire-bound documents are held together with a C shaped wire spine which binds the pages together securely, enabling them to turn 360 degrees and lay flat on the desk.

This is the most popular binding option for training manuals because the wire spine keeps the manual held together tightly and securely, and it’s great for longevity. If the manual needs to be written inside, a matt paper stock is recommended, although a silk paper stock will allow you to write with a biro.

Wire binding is cost-effective and usually, an acetate front cover and card back is added to your manuals to make them more durable.

ProsCons
• Durable• Doesn’t look as professional as a perfect-bound document
• Can lay flat on a desk• Pages cannot be added once the manual has been bound
• Easy to turn pages
• Printed tabs can be added easily before binding

Perfect binding

Perfect binding is often used for softback books, also known as paperback books, and sports a flat spine. The pages are printed loose and then glued to the spine area. The cover and spine are fully customisable in terms of design. Our softback books are bound just like those in your local book shop.

Perfect binding makes your manuals look professional and are great for storing on bookshelves. They are usually kept as a resource after a course has finished, however, perfect-bound books only work well if the page count is higher as they tend to close on themselves. Because pages are glued into the spine, images or text near the middle of the manual can be harder to read and can sometimes get lost when the pages bow.

ProsCons
• Can be kept afterwards as a keepsake• Cannot lay flat on a desk
• Looks professional• Only works well with documents that have a higher page count
• Perfect-bound documents are not good for heavy usage
• Can be costly
• Printed tabs cannot be added

Ring binding

Ring binding is a simple form of document binding. The pages are printed, hole-punched (2 or 4 holes) and attached to 2 or 4 rings inside the binder. Your ring binder can be printed with a customisable front cover and spine and it is easy to update rin-bound documents. Simply open the metal rings and add or remove the hole-punched pages as needed.

Ring binding is a popular option for training manuals and course materials. A more cost-effective option would be to have a cover and spine printed as well for your ring binder. Ring binders lie flat, however, the pages can be tedious to turn as you have to thread the page through the ring and tearing is inevitable if care isn’t taken.

Pages can be added after the final document has been bound, and pages can also be taken out. This can be both an advantage and disadvantage as people can remove pages as they please and content could then be missing. If you want your delegates to use the training manual regularly afterwards and add more sections in future, then this is recommended. However, ring-bound manuals are also bulkier and aren’t easy to transport in a suitcase or small bag.

ProsCons
• Sections, chapters or modules can be added easily after binding• Can be costly
• Ring binders can be re-used for other courses afterwards• Potential to be bulky and not easy to travel with
• Can lay flat on a desk
• Sturdy and durable
• Printed tabs can be added before or after binding

For more information on our company please pop over to our main website www.printroom.co.uk

For more information on Binding please look at our article Binding Services at More Than Just Print.

Im Not Happy With My Order2020-10-25T23:50:18+00:00

Please call 01344 452778 and ask to speak with client services. Please do remember to have your order number as this will help us locate your job.

Our team may ask for some photos to get an idea of the issue for you.

If you can’t to call or it is out of hours, then please drop us an email to [email protected] with as much detail as possible and well be happy to help you out.

How To Print Online2020-09-21T17:33:03+01:00

Printing your files online couldn’t be easier with Printroom Group.

Print online with  “More Than Just Print “. Simply choose a product from our print catalogue, and scroll to find our instant price calculator. By filling in the details using the drop-down menus for each option, your quote will be displayed instantly and update dynamically as you make changes to your options.

Once your details have been finalised, you will be taken to our secure checkout page where you will be asked about your preferred method of payment. We currently accept Visa, Mastercard and American Express.

Once your payment has been accepted, you will be taken to the artwork upload page which is where you will be able to upload your artwork files securely for us to print online.

Order Your Products Online – Choose from a wide range of products in our print catalogue.

Choose Your Specification – Our wide range of choices allow flexibility when ordering

Delivery & Checkout – We use DHL express. If you leave us your mobile number and e-mail you will receive a text from DHL when your order is on its way. This will have tracking details. You can change delivery. If you are not in you can ask your order to be left with a neighbour.

I’ve never heard of More Than Just Print – how long have you been around?

More than just print launched in 2020 as an online print shop, but we’re part of The Printroom Group. We are a family run business since 1977, we have four print sites across the Thames Valley and employ over 30 staff in Bracknell, Reading and Camberley. Our clients include some of the largest companies in the world. These include Dell, Oracle Corporation and HP. Find out more about The Printroom Group.

More than just print is part of The Printroom Group – the Thames Valley’s leading family-run print business for over 40 years

 

What is Tru-Card2020-09-22T12:12:25+01:00

Tru-card is a thick board that is used on report covers and postcards.

Tru-card is unique in that it is a gloss on one side and matt on the reverse.

Tru-Card is ideal when an image is to be sharp and glossy on the front but needs to be handwritten on the reverse.

Tru-Card is 350gsm 

What is Matt Lamination2020-09-22T22:41:05+01:00

Matt  Lamination is a finish applied to printed materials that has a matt look and feel.

Matt lamination is used a lot on business cards, brochure covers and menus.

It is also referred to as Matt Laminate or just Matt Lam.

The lamination is made from a thin layer of film that is applied to the printed material with heat and pressure.

It’s not ideal for writing on, though if you are using a ballpoint pen it can be written on. If you use an ink pen though it smudges unless left to dry.

Matt lamination is the most popular lamination effect in printing in the UK.

What Is Soft Touch Lamination2020-09-30T01:39:20+01:00

Soft Touch Lamination is a finish applied to printed materials that has a “bouncy” almost velvet-like feel. Because of the distinctive feel to the touch, it encourages people to pick up and touch the printed product. Its also referred to as velvet lamination.

Soft Touch lamination is matt

The lamination is made from a thin layer of film that is applied to the printed material with heat and pressure.

This type of lamination is used on high-end packaging as well as business cards, brochures, presentation folders and other printed marketing materials.

It’s not ideal for writing on, though if you are using a ballpoint pen it can be written on. If you use an ink pen though it smudges unless left to dry.

 

 

What is FSC Accredited Paper2020-08-11T00:12:25+01:00

What is FSC paper?

FSC stands for Forest Stewardship Council. The Forest Stewardship Council logo is on paper products that come from FSC certified forests.

The FSC promotes environmentally appropriate, socially beneficial, & economically viable management of the world’s forests.

What Does Environmentally Appropriate Mean?

In short, this means that the harvesting of paper and timber products maintain the biodiversity of the forest.

What Does Socially Beneficaly Mean?

This means that this helps both local people and society at large to enjoy long term benefits and also strong incentives to local people to sustain a long term management plan.

What Does Economically Viable Mean?

Forest operations are profitable without the expense of the forests natural eco-system.

How Does FSC Work?

Forests used for paper are inspected by the FSC. The FSC applies strict standards which are put in place by independent organisations. The forest must be environmentally appropriate and socially beneficial in an economical manner. If all rules are followed the FSC will apply their logo to the Forest and products that it produces.

In short, you know that you will be receiving a paper that has not been cut down just destroy a forest with big companies making vast amounts of money at the expensive of the local people …and to the environment.

 

 

Preparing Artwork For Printing2020-09-22T11:49:25+01:00

It’s 5 pm. You’re having another fight with your desktop printer.

You’ve already been battling this stubborn machine for an hour already. When your printer is finally accepting the paper in the tray, it refuses to print your image to the edge of the paper, plus you have a superb array of stripes throughout. Okay, make the image a little bigger… now it’s all blurry? Who has the time to deal with this nonsense?!

We do! We have learnt how to ensure your documents and artwork can be printed to the best capabilities. We are excited to share with you below, some helpful hints to make your lives easier (and ours!).

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1. File Formats
There are many file formats available to you such as EPS, TIF, JPG, PNG, PSD, AI, BMP or a PDF, but do you know which is best for print? Generally speaking, if you can export a high-resolution PDF file from the program you are working in, then this is your best option. GIFs are not intended for print reproduction, as we use those for the internet.

2. Resolution
Your image may look fine on screen but the printed version may not. Screen resolutions generally range from 72 to 220dpi. For print, the image needs to be 300dpi at the size you want to print it. As a general rule, image files under 250kb may not be sufficient for print. 251kb-1mb may be suitable for print up to A5. Over 1mb is usually adequate to print out up to A4.

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3. Supply Originals
Images should be supplied separately in their original formats. Word, Powerpoint or Excel compresses their embedded images and will suffer a loss of quality for print production.

4. Colour Mode
All images are captured using RGB (Red, Green, Blue); however, the majority of printing devices use CMYK (Cyan, Yellow, Magenta, and Black (K)). Ideally, you should convert the images to the colour mode of the output device. You can then also see how the colour will behave using that output process and be able to make allowances.

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5. True Black
Converting RGB to Black — heavier blacks can look weak and transparent in print, especially when there are thin white fonts, while lines or solid black over an image. If creating artwork from scratch, the best colour value is C30, Y30, M30, K100. Doing this will ensure a solid, rich black and will maintain reversed white text and lines.

6. Add Bleed
Bleed is an area around the document where images running up to the edge must exceed this point to avoid while-lining and allow paper movement when we trim the material. The bleed is usually an additional 3mm from each of the outer edges of the document or artwork.

7. Trim Marks
Trim marks serve two purposes; to allow for accurate positioning and trimming. You can automatically add these when you export the document as a PDF for commercial printing, depending on the program you are using.

8. Sourcing Images
If you used images downloaded from websites, then there is a high chance they will be blurry when printed. Time spent on sourcing the right pictures at the correct resolution, while keeping to our tips offered here, will do wonders for any document you want to print. You can source great images under the Creative Commons Licence at places like PixabayPexels and Stocksnap.

9. Copyright
Be very aware of using copyrighted material. Most imagery found on the internet does carry copyright. Unless marked as royalty-free, you are better off assuming there is copyright rather than running the risk of illegal infringement. Have a look at some best practices here.

10. Fonts
Supplying the fonts with your artwork is critical. You have the choice to either convert all type to outlines or make sure you package your file, including your fonts. You can find some fancy and free fonts via dafont.com or fontsquirrel.com.

You can also find our print guidelines on our website, which also includes a useful guide to paper sizes.

If there’s anything else you might want to ask us, you are always welcome to ask me. [email protected]

You can also look at my sites

www.printroom.co.uk

www.manual-printers.co.uk

www.printroom-largeformat.co.uk

What is A3 Size Paper?2020-09-22T01:53:19+01:00

What Size is A3 paper?

Many people ask “What are A3 dimensions? or “What is A3 size paper?”  It is one of the most popular paper sizes in the UK, in both business and homes. The size measures 297mm x 420mm is twice as big as A4 (standard UK letter size).  A3 paper is commonly used for presentations, posters, charts and portfolios. paper printing onto A3 sheets is still classed as small format printing and can be run on most small format digital printing machines. This size of paper can also be used in the making of A4 booklets, where 4 A4 pages are printed onto the one A3 sheet. This is achieved by printing two pages on one side of the sheet and two pages on the other side of the sheet.

 

What size is A3 Paper?

 

A3 Dimensions

Paper Size A3

  •  Millimeters:  298mm x 420mm
  •  Centimetres: 29.7 x 42cms
  •  Inches: 11.7 x 16.5 in

The width of an A3 corresponds to the length of an A4 piece of paper. An A3 piece of paper is exactly half of an A2 piece of paper and double an A4 piece of paper.

You can calculate the weight of an A3 sheet of paper by knowing that it is 1/8th of an A0 sheet. For an A0 sheet weighing 80gsm/m2, an A3 sheet will weigh 8o/8 = 10grams.

 

What is A3 Printing Used For?

The surface of an A3 sheet is perfectly suitable for creating any design ideas when you need something bigger than the standard A4 size. It’s also used for photos and printing children’s pictures at home.

This Paper size is also good for presentation printing. A3 paper can be bound landscape to make a larger book than normal and is ideal for printing charts and Excel Spreadsheets for a meeting. Tables and Diagrams are better presented when printed onto an A3 size sheet of paper.

It is also very popular for making small posters, used in may shop windows or offices for displaying messages. Fire Exit posters, warning posters and other Health and Safety posters are popular in A3 size.

 

History of A3 size Paper

The A paper sizes go back to the German scientist and philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.

At the beginning of the 20th Century, a Dr Walter Porstmann turned this idea into a system of paper sizes. This was introduced as the DIN paper sizes on the 18th August 1922 in Germany. Even in  2020 paper sizes are still referred to as “DIN A4” in Germany and Austria.

A3 size paper was first standardised in the UK in 1975.

I’ve never heard of More Than Just Print – how long have you been around?

More than just print launched in 2020 as an online print shop, but we’re part of The Printroom Group. We are a family run business since 1977, we have four print sites across the Thames Valley and employ over 30 staff in Bracknell, Reading and Camberley. Our clients include some of the largest companies in the world. These include Dell, Oracle Corporation and HP. Find out more about The Printroom Group.

More than just print is part of The Printroom Group – the Thames Valley’s leading family-run print business for over 40 years

To see all of Our Products Click on our Product Page

How to convert Word to PDF?2020-09-22T01:42:01+01:00

How To Convert Word File To PDF

If you need to send either ourselves or any printing company files to print, PDF files are the most common and best files to use to ensure consistency across platforms. PDF stands for Portable Document File.

Why you should use a PDF file over a Word file.

When working with a commercial print company, PDF files have a perfect balance of both file size and quality. Word files can change from computer to computer without you realising, which means what you see on your screen won’t necessarily be the same as we see on our screen. Below we will show you how to convert Word to PDF

Word files can also do something known as ‘flow’. This means that the bottom line of text from one page can move to the top line of the next page. This leaves your original document looking out of sync to your printed product. 

Fonts can also change in Word documents when viewed on different computers, which again means that what gets printed will not match what you see on your screen. Another thing to be aware of is that images and photos can disappear, and Word will not tell us when things are missing so issues like this aren’t flagged with the printing company.

Compatibility

PDF files are an industry-standard filetype and used across multiple channels, not just print!

File Size

PDF file sizes are always determined for you to make sure your file is not too big or too small

Editability

Protect your files with PDF format to make it harder for 3rd parties to edit your files.

Quality

PDF files give you a true representation of what your printed file will look like.

Always send a PDF file when using a commercial print company

For more information on converting Word To PDF e-mail us at [email protected]

I’ve never heard of More Than Just Print – how long have you been around?

More than just print launched in 2020 as an online print shop, but we’re part of The Printroom Group. We are a family run business since 1977, we have four print sites across the Thames Valley and employ over 30 staff in Bracknell, Reading and Camberley. Our clients include some of the largest companies in the world. These include Dell, Oracle Corporation and HP. Find out more about The Printroom Group.

More than just print is part of The Printroom Group – the Thames Valley’s leading family-run print business for over 40 years

To see all of Our Products Click on our Product Page

 

What are the different ways to fold paper for print?2020-09-22T01:37:04+01:00

Print Folds: There are so many ways to fold a piece of paper – and making the right choice can be difficult.

With so many ways to fold a piece of paper when getting things printed, it can be hard to even know what to ask for. Leaflets, pamphlets, brochures, menus – the list is endless. So many of the marketing materials that people need to be printed will fall into what can be called the ‘standard’ fold types such as:

  • Half fold
  • Tri fold
  • Gate fold
  • Z folds
  • Concertina fold

Plus many other more complex folds, bi-directional folds, even printed maps.

Choosing the right paper is the most important factor in the folding process.
The right paper not only looks great but is also important from a functional point of view.

Choosing the wrong paper on a folded job can have disappointing results, for example:

  • A large-sized brochure printed on thin paper will be droopy and likely to crease and feel cheap
  • A large folded poster printed on thick card stock may not lay flat

To help you understand some of the options we have available, and to see clear illustrations of what each fold type looks like, please feel free to download this handy PDF guide to print folding options.

Download Free guide

I’ve never heard of More Than Just Print – how long have you been around?

More than just print launched in 2020 as an online print shop, but we’re part of The Printroom Group. We are a family run business since 1977, we have four print sites across the Thames Valley and employ over 30 staff in Bracknell, Reading and Camberley. Our clients include some of the largest companies in the world. These include Dell, Oracle Corporation and HP. Find out more about The Printroom Group.

More than just print is part of The Printroom Group – the Thames Valley’s leading family-run print business for over 40 years

To see all of Our Products Click on our Product Page

How do I set up bleed for my documents?2020-09-22T01:29:21+01:00

How do I set up bleed for my documents?

In print terminology, bleed is a term you’ll hear if you wish to print your artwork to the edge of the paper.  When sending files to commercial print companies, you will usually be asked to supply your artwork with printers marks. If you want to print up to the edges of your design, you will use crop marks and optional bleed marks to do this.

To print to the paper’s edge without any margins around first extend your design into a bleed area so it’s slightly larger than your finished print size. You’ll then add print crop marks (either manually, or automatically depending on the software you are using. The crop marks show the printer where to trim the paper to the document’s finished print size. Your design should extend past these crop marks. The excess will be trimmed off after it’s printed, and your design will cover the entire page.

Each software application has its own specific way to set up bleed, but the fundamental principle is the same – as illustrated in this image.

set print bleed

The following links will take you to help which explains how to set up bleed in the most popular design applications.

Remember, you only need to worry about setting up bleed for your documents if you want to print edge-to-edge.  If your design does not touch the edge of the paper, then you don’t need bleed. If possible, it is always best to supply your files with crop marks even when no bleed is required.  All print companies will offer help if you are unsure of the right way to setup your files. They will also have pre-press teams who can help you, or do this for you. As long as you can supply the files, the print design teams or Mac Operators can usually work their magic. If you are ever in doubt, just call or email your questions.

For more useful guides to setting up artwork for print, please visit our Print FAQ page

What is Spot UV?2021-01-06T23:56:58+00:00

Spot UV is a way of adding a wow-factor to your print.

This is a print finishing technique that works by applying a clear varnish, which is cured by ultraviolet light, in selected spots over your printed piece.  This is particularly effective when used in combination with soft-touch, matt or silk stocks – the effect of the texture contrast is always very striking and impressive.

Spot UV and spot gloss are common terms which are used interchangeably for the print finishing technique of applying a high gloss UV coating to a selective area on a printed piece.

A common use of spot UV is to draw attention to a certain area of the printed piece, such as placing over a logo so that only the logo area is glossy. This finishing effect is also is very popular on brochures, menus and even business cards. Thanks to recent advanced in digital printing, Spot UV has become an affordable option and no longer just for the elite jobs or large run litho projects as it was in the past.

This can be applied to inked areas on your printing to enhance your design. It can also be used bt applying directly to the paper surface without any ink. Because it’s a high gloss so it will work really well when applied over darker colours. It also adds a really high-end look when applied over a matt laminate. The matt laminate really highlights the Spot UV as there is a contrast in both Matt and Gloss.

Get in touch with our print experts!

0845 072 2778 email [email protected]

Our friendly and knowledgable team are happy to answer any questions you may have.

Get a free quotation
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